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Amy Blitchok is a professional writer interested in researching and disseminating important information about aging in place and mobility technology. She currently writes for AmeriGlide.

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  1. Patricia Whitney-Jones
    Patricia Whitney-Jones at | | Reply

    Wonderful link!

  2. For Older Adults, Health Tech is About Useability #NHITWeek | HealthCetera - CHMP's Blog

    […] easier we make it for older adults to adopt emerging health technologies, the more likely it is that many seniors will be able to age in place longer, enhance their social […]

  3. Aging in Place
    Aging in Place at | | Reply

    This is really an interesting app which helps elders to live a comfortable life in future. By incorporating software programs and monitoring device into homes will help to increase well being. Thanks for this new app invention.. appreciate your talent and hardwork in developing this….

  4. Phil Willis
    Phil Willis at | | Reply

    It’s so great to hear about technology allowing people to stay in their homes longer and more safely.

    Thanks for the post.

  5. Madeleine Kolb
    Madeleine Kolb at | | Reply

    As a BBB (born before the Boomers), this technology seems to assume that a person aging in place is fragile and needs constant supervision.

    I see several complications. One is that the technology may not be compatible with home security systems. In my residential neighborhood there are frequent break-in attempts. We’ve installed a security system which can detect motion, open doors or windows, and smoke or fire.

    We’ve had to put the motion detectors up high to avoid our cat triggering an alarm by jumping on the back of the sofa. And I’ve set off the smoke-fire alarm more than once when cooking dinner on the stove. Fortunately, my husband is able to disable the alarm when that happens.

    And in terms of wireless blood pressure monitors and cardiac monitors, how does anyone know whether someone in the dwelling is having a heart attack or just having sex? Talk about intrusive.

    1. Kavan Peterson, Editor, ChangingAging.org
      Kavan Peterson, Editor, ChangingAging.org at | | Reply

      “And in terms of wireless blood pressure monitors and cardiac monitors, how does anyone know whether someone in the dwelling is having a heart attack or just having sex? Talk about intrusive.”

      Madeleine, you are the best.

    2. nwlambear
      nwlambear at | | Reply

      I like the BBB (born before boomers). and…you post was great. I agree with all your comments as well. ~Tricia (age 70)

    3. Amy Blitchok
      Amy Blitchok at | | Reply

      Madeleine, you make some excellent points. As with most technology, I think the most important component is the human factor, meaning that the successful implementation relies on the caregiver and patient being able to have an open and honest conversation and reaching an agreement about the use of potentially intrusive devices. Establishing boundaries that protect privacy can make the difference between an elderly parent feeling empowered or oppressed by technology.

Is this post changing aging? Please comment!