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Christian Wilson currently works in the home care industry. He writes about issues facing the elderly and spends a lot of his work day answering questions regarding home care. When he’s not at work he enjoys traveling with his family and meeting new people.

36 Responses

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  1. tumwineb
    tumwineb at | | Reply

    Yes, the post reflect real issues and some peoples perceptions on aging.
    Thanks, keep it-up

  2. janet gelein
    janet gelein at | | Reply

    You captured the essence of our problems when it comes to growing older. I look forward to another blog that discusses how home care (?as an industry) can help those trying to live at home with limited support.

  3. Paul Falkowski
    Paul Falkowski at | | Reply

    You’ve hit the nail square on the head. Our societal values drive the treatment of our elders. I guess the upshot is, if there is one, we’ll always have work.

  4. Phil Willis
    Phil Willis at | | Reply

    So true.

    It’s a fear of confronting our own future that makes us reluctant to connect to older people.

    It’s a shame, because having people in your life of all ages adds a great deal.

    Thanks for highlighting the issue.

  5. Guest Author: Deconstructing the Cultural Narrative of Ageing

    [...] of the elderly in the media are framed in a negative way. Christian has also the author of A Socioeconomic Critique of Ageing at ChangingAging: Exploring Life Beyond Adulthood. I hope you enjoy Christian’s [...]

  6. Ashton Applewhite
    Ashton Applewhite at | | Reply

    How refreshing to see capitalism referenced directly. It’s at the heart of the problem, and the value of unpaid work, much carried out by older members of society, is seldom taken into account. There’s a chillingly apt term for the absence of representation of older people in the media: “symbolic annihilation.” (http://www.thischairrocks.com/?q=post/chilling-term-ageism-media-%E2%80%9Csymbolic-annihilation%E2%80%9D

  7. seniorpreneur
    seniorpreneur at | | Reply

    Seniors have the qualities of maturity, wisdom, skills, contacts, experience and a desire to make this society a better place to live for everyone. Also, seniors should be valued for their past, present and any future contributions. I challenge all seniors to ‘step up to the plate’ and support my ‘Seniorpreneur Project’ and get empowered to focus on more lifelong learning opportunities and the area of entrepreneurship. Yes, the 50+ demographic is being inundated with countless new products and/or services. However; the marketing concept of ‘buyer beware’ applies to ALL ages. As a result, we will probably still require some financial education and financial literacy, to enable more seniors to enjoy their pre-retirement or retirement life in the way that they want for themselves and their families. Furthermore, seniors will probably need to speak up more, especially in the areas of seniors rights, ageism, pesky marketing schemes and scams, and demand more lifelong learning opportunities to increase the quality of life for seniors.

  8. Christian Wilson
    Christian Wilson at | | Reply

    Thanks guys! I honestly never expected this article to be so well-received. It’s pretty amazing to know that there are so many people out there who are so passionate about eliminating the structural inequalities created by ageism.

  9. A Socioeconomic Critique of Ageing | Exploring Life Microblog

    [...] via A Socioeconomic Critique of Ageing. [...]

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